Chicken Roti – Grenada, West Indies Style

Peas:
1 package Yellow Split Peas
1/3 Pot Water (for cooking peas)
½ tsp Salt
Heaping tsp Brown Sugar

Heat water, salt and brown sugar – add peas to boiling water – stir often – cook until peas are soft.

Boonjal:
Peas (Cooked Peas from above)
Large Onion
Garlic
Pepper
Curry (2 Tbsp)
Oil (3 Tbsp – any kind, vegetable, olive, canola, etc…)
Garam Masala

Heat oil – add onion and stir until brown (really brown) – add garlic – stir – add curry and pepper, sitr – add peas and stir – sprinkle in Garam Masala.

Cool Boonjal mixture after cooking and grind to fine texture (should be the consistency of fine corn meal).

Chicken Curry:
Lime (½ lime juice only, no seeds)
Chicken Thighs (blood removed *
Potatoes
Ginger (thumb size)
Lemon Grass (2 blades)
Black Pepper
Salt
Curry Powder
Celery
Seasoning Peppers (6)
Chives
Shadow Bennie
Garlic (10 big cloves – 5 chopped, 5 whole)
2 Medium Onions
Millette’s Home Blend Seasoning – Green (3 Tbsp)
Ketchup (3 – 4 Tbsp)
Garam Masala
Cloves (5 whole)

* To remove the blood from the chicken place the chicken in a bowl, pour ½ tsp of salt and enough water to cover chicken in bowl – blood will rise to the top – pour off water

Sprinkle chicken with black pepper and 2 Tbsp of curry powder and set aside – finely chop celery, seasoning peppers, chives, shadow bennie, 5 garlic cloves and 1 onion. Mix chopped items with Millettes seasoning and ketchup in a large bowl. Add chicken. Peel potatoes and cut into big chunks – add to mixture. Slice thumb size ginger into mixture. Add cloves into mixture and stir. Sprinkle more curry and garam masala on top of mixture.

Heat oil in large pot – add 1 medium chopped onion and cook down. Add 5 whole garlic cloves and cook down. Add curry and stir. Add chicken mixture and stir. Add water to bowl and pour into pot. Stir often. Continue to add hot water throughout cooking process (never add cold water). Add 2 heaping spoons of the Boonjal mixture and stir to thicken. Once the potatoes are soft remove from heat. Remove the lemon grass and cloves.

Roti Skins:
2 lbs Flour (to one pack of split peas) – Plus extra for resting/kneading/rolling dough
Crisco (½ can or 8 ounces)
Baking Powder (4 Tbsp)
Salt (1 tsp plus a pinch)
Hot Water
Damp paper towels
Oil

Mix flour, baking powder and salt – fold in Crisco with hands – add hot tap water until doughy – knead until dough is smooth – let rest for 5 minutes – sprinkle with flour and knead.

Spread damp paper towels on flat surface and lightly flour (to rest the dough balls). Pinch off dough balls and roll in hand (palm size – as smooth as possible). Stretch out dough balls to an even circle slightly larger than palm. Fill with Boonjal mixture and pinch closed – place on damp paper towel to rest – cover with damp paper towel.

Flour cutting board – take one of the balls and press flat with palm of hand. Roll out evenly in all directions with floured wooden rolling pin. Turn over and roll again.

Heat oil in cast iron skillet (cover bottom of skillet) – place roti skin in hot oil, oil the top of the roti, when the skin bubbles turn over (skins should resemble flour tortillas). Cover skins with clean dish towel to keep warm.

Chicken Roti:
Place a roti skin on a plate – fill with chicken curry mixture – turn in each side of skin (like a burrito) and turn over so smooth side is up. Enjoy!

2 Responses to Chicken Roti – Grenada, West Indies Style

  1. paddy kamen says:

    Hello,

    Thank you for publishing this recipe!

    I lived in Grenada, in Sauteurs, for four months when I was just 19 years old. I adored the rotis with curried chicken that I would buy at a little take out shop with a few stools every Saturday night. Oh my, they were good.

    I’ve never had curried chicken quite like that since and so I am excited to find this recipe.

    I’m wondering if you can explain a few things so that perhaps I can translate the ingredients into stuff I can buy here in Canada (note, I don’t live in a part of Canada that has a West Indian population)? Please describe: seasoning peppers, Shadow Bennie, Millets Home Blend Seasoning? Also, is there a particular brand of curry powder that is recommended?

    With appreciation,

    Paddy

  2. Shawna says:

    Hi Paddy,

    So glad you found our site. We absolutely love Grenada and the food we have had there. Hopefully I can answer your questions:

    1) Seasoning peppers – They have these beautiful little green, red and yellow peppers in Grenada that are not hot but have a wonderful flavor (sorry, I haven’t been able to find them in North America). I have used fairly mild jalapeno’s instead, not quite the same flavor but still good. If you are very careful with a scotch bonnet pepper, you could put a whole one in and remove it at the end, but if it busts, it could add a lot of heat.

    2) Shadow Bennie – Is the Caribbean version of cilantro. It is not quite as “bold” as the cilantro we get here in North America so I would use just a little less cilantro than what the recipe calls for, instead of shadow bennie.

    3) Millets Home Blend Seasoning – Well, not sure what to tell you on this one. I haven’t seen it since we have been back in the States and can’t even find it on line. Suggestion would be to try a green salsa (not too hot, jut adding more flavor).

    4) Brand of Curry Powder – Of course they use curry powder that was created from the “Isle of Spice” in Grenada, so if it was imported from Grenada, it should be great.

    Good luck with this, let us know how it works out! I believe I will have to make this again soon, you have made me crave it as well 🙂

    Shawna

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